Bird Life in the Galapagos

Each island features different types of birds.  I knew there would be birds, but was not prepared for the volume, diversity and incredible beauty. We crossed the equator towards Genovesa , a volcanic caldera that is home to many bird species: red-footed boobies with their scarlet webbed feet, Nasca boobies, Galapagos mocking birds with their piercing eyes, four species of Darwin Finches,  and the elusive short eared owl as it hunted over an open lava field.  On Fernandina, we walked on a coral sand beach where swallow-tailed and lava gulls gather near tide pools.  As we entered a forest of cactus and mangroves where great frigate birds were nesting, the males inflated their striking red throat pouches to attract females as they flew overhead.

On stark Espanola Island we saw many pairs of blue footed boobies perform their ritual mating dance, lifting their bright cerulean feet, offering gifts of twigs to each other. Espanola  is also the only nesting place of the wave albatross, a gallant bird, majestic in the air but awkward ashore.

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About The blog of travel & lifestyle journalist Melody Wren

Melody is a freelance writer because she believes that work and fun should not be mutually exclusive. She writes about travel, food, lifestyle and green living. Melody loves staying in a place long enough to get acquainted. Local customs, markets and traditional cultures are magnets for this writer. When not writing she’s either on the road, in the air, or savoring something tasty. Most of her travels feature outdoor adventures of some sort, although she typically avoids sleeping on the ground. She is an ordinary person that enjoys challenging and pushing herself, facing fears with an eye on experiential travel. She needs to do it, feel it and see it so she can write about it. Her hope is that her stories encourage readers to get out there and do the same.
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